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The Emergency Service Medals 1939-1946

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(An Bonn Seirbhise Eigeandala)

by Eamonn O’Toole

Medals were instituted on October 6, 1944 for award to those who served the qualifying periods with good conduct. However, the production and issue of the insignia did not commence until 1947.

The series is probably unique in that the medals have a 1 common obverse but no fewer than eleven different reverses and two types of ribbons. Some of these are very rare but the majority are common, having been issued in the tens of thousands.

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White Star Losses In The 1914-18 War

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Due To The Activities Of German U-Boats

by J. Morton

The 1914-18 War saw the destruction of merchant shipping on an unprecedented scale with Great Britain alone losing almost 2,500 ships, the vast majority of which fell victim to a new weapon perfected by Germany, the U-Boat. Even today, nearly ninety years on, statistics relating to merchant shipping losses during the war, together with the associated passenger and crew casualties make grim reading.

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Deserter Offers to Re-Enlist

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by Liam Dodd

Private Michael Connor of the Royal Irish Regiment, who is a native of Tipperary, called at the Wicklow police barrack on Tuesday of last week and said he wanted to enlist. Examination disclosed the fact that Connor was wearing a military shirt and on being questioned he admitted he was a deserter from the regiment. The military authorities having been communicated with, an escort arrived and took the man in charge.

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Irishmen Who Died In U.S. Armed Services

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by Liam Dodd

The American Legation wishes to announce that in accordance with the established practice of the United States Government of returning the bodies of deceased soldiers home for burial when so requested by the next-of-kin, there will arrive at Collinstown Airport on July 5th, three military aircraft containing the remains of the following men from Ireland who died in the American Armed Services during the last war.

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The Man who became his Brothers Ghost

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by Brad Hunter

The amazing story of the Irishman who assumed the identity of his dead Victoria Cross sibling only to suffer a hero’s death of his own on the other side of the world.

On the afternoon of June 9, 1866, a train pulled into a siding just outside the Canadian city of Quebec. Locked inside were 800 German immigrants. In another car was 2,000lbs of ammunition for use against Irish-American Fenian raiders from across the US border. It was the job of Private Timothy O’Hea of the 1st Battalion Rifle Brigade to guard the precious consignment.

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Book Review: Almost a Rebellion - The Irish Army Mutiny of 1924

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Written by by M.G. Valiulis, Tower Books of Cork, 1985

On 6 March 1924 a Major General and a Colonel presented an ultimatum to the government of the Irish Free State, demanding that the government meet with them and other disaffected officers to discuss their interpretation of the Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1921. They set the following conditions:

    a.    that the Army Council be disbanded
    b.    an immediate suspension of Army reorganization and demobilization.
Last Updated on Thursday, 15 October 2009 14:42 Register to read more...
 

Dublin University O.T.C.

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Commenting on Roger Willoughby’s book on this subject, Captain W.W.F. Chatterton Dickson RN writes:
“My father was a mechanical engineering student at TCD from about 1912 until he enlisted (with his motorbike) as a despatch rider in September 1914. He had been a keen member of the OTC and took part in the Summer 1914 manoeuvres both in Ireland and England before they were overtaken by the war. He eventually took a BA at Trinity in 1916 when home on leave from France in 1916.”
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A Christmas Celebration Aboard U.46

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by J. Morton

Andania

On 27th January 1918 the 13,405 ton Cunard liner ANDANIA, on a voyage from Liverpool to New York carrying passengers and general cargo, was torpedoed two miles N.N.E of Rathlin Island, Co. Antrim by the German submarine U.46 commanded by Kapitanleutnant Leo Hillebrand. Seven of the crew were killed by the torpedo explosion, including Edward Fox whose 1914-18 War and Mercantile Marine medals I have, but the rest of the crew and passengers were taken off safely by other vessels in the area. Forty-six year old fireman Edward Fox from Henley, the only war casualty of that name in the Mercantile Marine, was probably working below in the stokehold when the torpedo struck. His body was never recovered and he is commemorated, by name, on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

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Bertram Covill

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Recipient of Three Gallantry Awards

While serving as a naval rating in a defensively equipped merchantman, Bertram Covill received three awards for the same act of gallantry in the Battle of the Atlantic in 1941. The Adams Beck, in which he was a gunner, was bombed of the Irish coast by the Luftwaffe and the crew were forced to take to her lifeboats. On discovering that his chief engineer was missing and that their vessel was likely to sink, Covill swam back and managed to reboard her.

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Deserted from Four Regiments

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by Liam Dodd

Private David Perry was charged at Derry Petty Sessions yesterday with being a deserter from the 4th Battalion Royal Inniskillings Fusiliers at Clonmany and he was ordered to be handed over to an escort. It was stated that he deserted from the 4th Inniskillings on the 15th March last and at the end of March he enlisted in the Lancashire Fusiliers and deserted from them on June 5th. On July 20th he joined the 3rd Inniskillings and again deserted, while later he enlisted in the Royal Irish Regiment and deserted from it.
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A Soldier's Protest

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by Liam Dodd

Frank Sutton a private in the 6th Leinster's appeared at Lucan Petty Sessions yesterday to protest against an application for a decree of ejectment against him for possession of the keeper's cottage at the 7th lock of the Grand Canal. On behalf of the Grand Canal Company it was pointed out that the cottage since Sutton's enlistment was in possession of his wife and it was necessary to have a man in charge of the lock.
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A Soldier's Bravery

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Private Shanahan, Connaught Rangers, Fermoy was responsible on Tuesday night for saving the life of a child named Green from drowing in the Blackwater at Fermoy. The child was aged about three years and was on the point of being taken by the current at the mill-race, when Shanahan jumped in and brought the child to safety on the bank. Colonel Crockett who lives near by, hearing of the occurrence took the rescuer's name and regiment for the purpose of having him rewarded.
 
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Major Thomas J. Crean, VC, DSO (1873-1923)

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by Patricia Moorhead

On 18th December 1901 Surgeon Captain Thomas Joseph Crean took part in heavy fighting at Tygerskloof during the Boer War. He showed great bravery attending to the wounded during heavy fighting. Although wounded himself, he continued to treat the wounded under heavy fire, with complete disregard for his own life until he was wounded a second time in the abdomen. At first it was feared he had been mortally wounded, but his slowly recovered. For this act of heroism the 28 year old Dublin born doctor was awarded the Victoria Cross.

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Royal Dublin Fusiliers New Naas Depot

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The building of a new military barrack to accommodate 19 officers and 300 men was commenced on a site near the town of Naas in August 1810. It replaced a barrack on the south moat which had  been damaged in 1798. The architects for the barrack were Messrs. Bernell, Browning & Behan and itwas completed three years later at a cost of £17,900. When in 1881 the British army was recognised and the identification of units with specific localities was being promoted the territorial system was also introduced. Part of these changes including the nomination of the 66th Brigade as the Royal Dublin Fusiliers and the Madras Fusiliers became the 1st Battalion of the regiment, the Bombays became the 2nd Battalion, while the Kildare, Dublin City and Dublin County militia regiments became the 3rd, 4th and 5th Battalions respectively. Naas was designated as the depot of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers.

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Dalkey Soldier's Death

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Thrilling Story of Self-Sacrifice

by Liam Dodd

The story of how an Irish Lancer gave up his life when a prisoner in the hands of the Germans in order that a patrol of his own comrades, who were walking into a trap, might be saved, is told of Edward Richardson of the 17th Lancers, fourth son of Henry Richardson, Torca Hill, Dalkey. The heroic death which occurred on the 12th October is told in a letter written to Mrs Richardson, his mother, by another Dalkey man, Sergeant Major Drew of the 5th Lancers, son of Mr. Thomas Drew, Castle Street, Dalkey.
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Shocking Injuries

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by Liam Dodd

Private J.G. Heath, age 21, formerly of the London Irish Rifles and recently attached to the Royal Defence Corps at Bramley prisoners camp, met with a shocking death at Bramely station yesterday. Falling from a wagon he became entangled in the wheel and his head was nearly torn off. He sustained other shocking injuries. He had been twice wounded in France. 

Source

Freeman's Journal 12th January 1918

 

Officer's Tragic Death

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by Liam Dodd

Mr. James Murray, Coroner for East Wicklow, held an inquest at Bromley Kilpedder near Bray yesterday concerning the tragic death of Major Edward Victor C. Wellesley, Royal Engineers, who was 27 years of age, was home on leave from the front since Friday last and while in the garage cleaning a German shell fuse on Monday about 3 p.m. an explosion was heard. On the father Major H.C. Wellesley J.P. going into the garage a few minutes later he discovered his son lying dead in a pool of blood, while there were extensive injuries about the head, body and arms. Dr. J.S. Jameson, Greystones deposed that when he arrived at 3.30 life was extinct. Death was due to shock resulting from the injuries caused by the explosion, the jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony and added that the occurrence was accidental. 

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A Plucky Royal Irish Invalid

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by Liam Dodd

Tuesday afternoon a jennet attached to a county cart heavily laden took flight in Parnell Street, Clonmel and ran at increasing speed in the direction of the Mall. There was a good deal of traffic in the street at the time and a nasty accident might have occurred but for the prompt and courageous action of Private G. Rowsell of the 5th Battalion Royal Irish Regiment, who arrived in town that day on sick furlough from Salonika.

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DCM for Wexford Gunner

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by Liam Dodd

On Monday morning at the military barracks Wexford, Gunner Patrick Nolan was decorated with the D.C.M. for conspicuous gallantry, he being the means of conveying valuable information concerning enemy movements during the battle of Arras. Gunner Nolan is attached to R.G.A. and is a son of the late Matthew Nolan, Island Road, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford.

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Naval Court-martial Queenstown Training Ship

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Senior Lieutenant Sentences

by Liam Dodd

A Naval Court-martial sat at Devonport today for the trial of Lieutenant Charles Colbeck of H.M.S. Vivid and late Senior Lieutenant of Black Prince training ship at Queenstown, on a charge of absenting from the latter ship without leave. The accused pleaded guilty.
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Irish Army, F.A. Medal (1912-‘13)

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by Liam Dodd

At the Society’s Medal Fair in the Teacher's Club in Parnell Square last March, one of the dealers, Austin Fennessy, had for sale a small silver sports medal (hallmarked Birmingham 1912). It was the Irish Army Football Association Challenger Cup Medal won by PTE Taylor. I bought the medal and on researching it I found out PTE Taylor had missed the final as he was injured. In the run up to the final he had played in every match and was the Norfolk's best player, so the regiment made sure he received a winners medal when they had won the final.

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