Medal Society of Ireland

www.msoi.eu

  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size
Home Browse Journal Articles
Browse Articles

Collecting Irish Badges J16

E-mail Print PDF

by Liam Byrne

To start off this issue I’m going to update some lists that I gave you in previous issues. To start with, the United Nations Force in Lebanon (U.N.I.F.I.L.).

Register to read more...
 

Military Memorials in Ireland

E-mail Print PDF

by Eamonn O’Toole

The name of Enniskillen will long live in infamy. It was at that Fermanagh town’s War Memorial during prayers on Remembrance Day 1987 that an IRA bomb exploded without warning, killing eleven innocent civilians and wounding about thirty others. The Memorial itself was undamaged but the town authorities and the Royal British Legion decided that it should be reconstructed to a new design which would include mention of the murdered civilians. Their names could not be shown on the memorial itself as this is of course reserved for those killed in war but they were included in bronze on the outside of the small surround wall and are additionally represented by eleven bronze doves affixed to the plinth. The plinth itself is surmounted by a life size bronze figure of a fusilier in WW1 dress, resting on his arms reversed. This figure was part of the original memorial, unveiled on 25 October 1922 by the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, Viscount Fitzalan. The bronze plaques around contain the names of over 700 of the fallen, very heavy losses for a small Irish town.

Register to read more...
 

Strange But True

E-mail Print PDF
Godfrey Ledge served for many years in the Irish Army and retired the proud wearer of five medals, one of which, the Service Medal, bore on the reverse his name and army number - 8286.
Register to read more...
 

The Fighting Fusiliers

E-mail Print PDF
A Patriotic Song. Words by R.H. Lloyd. Music by H.E. McLean. F. Pitman Hart and Co. London. Price six pence.

This patriotic song, dedicated by kind permission of Colonel Tizard of the 1st Battalion Royal Munster Fusiliers, should be very popular with lovers of martial music and stirring verse, such as this is. The author is a member of a Co. Limerick family, and some years hence was an official in the local branch of the Bank of Ireland. He pays a very happy tribute indeed to the gallantry and heroism of the Munsters. The opening lines are:
Register to read more...
 

Regimental Colours in St. Patrick’s Cathedral

E-mail Print PDF

(JOURNAL No 18, page 11)

It has been ascertained that the regimental Colours on display in the north transept of St. Patrick’s Cathedral are as follows:

Register to read more...
 

The Royal Irish Revived

E-mail Print PDF

By an extraordinary coincidence the Royal Irish Regiment is to be revived seventy years to the day after its disbandment. It was announced in the House of Commons on 23 July 1991 that the Royal Irish Rangers and the Ulster Defence Regiment are to amalgamate in Jul 1992 to form the Royal Irish Regiment of one regular and seven local service battalions. Those enthusiasts for the old 18th Foot, and there are not a few in the ranks of our members, will doubtless be thrilled by the news and their treasured mementoes will take on an entirely new significance.

Register to read more...
 

Mansion House Committee Medal for 'Palme' Disaster

E-mail Print PDF

by James Morton

On the morning of 24 December 1895 the barque PALME of Finland, then anchored about 1½ miles from Kingstown Harbour in Dublin Bay was observed to be dragging her anchor in a strong SSE gale. A lifeboat from Kingstown capsized while going to her assistance and the entire crew of fifteen were drowned. A second lifeboat which followed also capsized but righted itself without loss of life; it was so damaged however that it could play no further part in the rescue. Attempts on the following day by lifeboats from other stations, and a steam tug, also failed.

Register to read more...
 

Good Conduct Medal Awards for 1989

E-mail Print PDF

by Raymond M. Duke

The awards for 1988 were listed in JOURNAL No 11.

 

Good Conduct Medal Awards for 1989

Register to read more...
 

The Forty Tens

E-mail Print PDF
In the pre-WW1 regular army the Leinster Regiment were known as the “Forty Tens.” The way we received this strange nickname was that in the early history of the Regiment a man who was somewhat the worse for wear with drink and stood number 50 in the ranks called out “Forty Ten” after 49 when the company numbering. Wherever the Regiment has served this number will be found written, carved or chiselled - from the Pyramids to Ottawa, from India to South Africa to Silesia. It was once seen tarred on the bows of a battleship riding at anchor in Jamaica.

“STAND TO,” Captain F.C. Hitchcock, 1937
 

The Tayleur Medal

E-mail Print PDF

by James Morton

The emigrant ship TAYLEUR, on passage from Liverpool to Melbourne with over 500 people on board, foundered on Lambay Island, some ten miles north east of Dublin Bay, on 21 January 1854. Nearly half the complement, including practically all the women and children, perished and the Tayleur Fund was set up to aid the survivors. From this fund medallic awards were occasionally made. Around 1913 the trustees of the Fund agreed with the Royal National Lifeboat Institution to hand over the balance of the Fund in return for an undertaking that a motor lifeboat would be based at Kingstown (Dun Laoghaire).
Register to read more...
 

Book Review: Battle Lines

E-mail Print PDF

Journal of the Somme Association, 638 Springfield Road, Belfast

The first issue of this 24 page journal contains much of interest to members of our Society and the new association which publishes it is advertised elsewhere in the JOURNAL. In pursuit of its admirable objectives the first issue of BATTLE LINES contains illustrated features on the rededication of the Ulster Memorial Tower at Thiepval (a replica of Helen’s Tower at Clandeboye near Bangor), Major David Nelson VC of Co. Monaghan, the battles of Ginchy and Guillement in 1916 involving the 16th (Irish Division, and the stories of ordinary working class soldiers from Belfast. Altogether an effort worthy of support in Ireland.
Register to read more...
 

Garda Siochana Peacekeepers Medal

E-mail Print PDF

By Eamonn O’Toole

About 25,000 Irish soldiers have been involved in UN peacekeeping missions over the past thirty years, earning for themselves some 20 different UN Service Medals. They are also awarded the Peacekeeping Medal instituted by the Irish Government (JOURNAL No 10, p15) and it is not unusual nowadays to see Irish officers wearing up to eight ribbons, most of them UN service awards.

Register to read more...
 

Book Review: A Conquered Sea

E-mail Print PDF
Jack Boddington. Softback, 90pp. Illustrated b/w.

With such a great number of well produced and profusely illustrated books on the awards of the USA in existence, it might be supposed that there is nothing useful to add on the subject. That this is not the case is able demonstrated by Jack Boddington in this entirely original work of reference.
 
Register to read more...
 

Letters to the Editor

E-mail Print PDF

I note with interest a letter published in your JOURNAL No 14 written by Mr. John Patrick Colgan.

Mr. Colgan is of the opinion that there were some Irish regiments present at Waterloo other than the two Inniskilling regiments. He cites the 18th Light Dragoons as being an Irish regiment as it was raised in Ireland by the Earl of Drogheda in 1759. This is of course true, but it does not follow that if a regiment is raised in a particular country that it can claim that nationality in its description. The most convenient example of this is the 35th of Foot (The Royal Sussex Regiment), formed in Ireland in 1701 by the Earl of Donegal but laying no claim to be Irish. Others were the 24th-36th and the 39th of Foot who again have never claimed the prefix ‘Irish’ in their titles. As a matter of interest, the 40th of Foot was raised in Nova Scotia and did not set foot in England for 60 years but was always considered an English county regiment.

Register to read more...
 

Collecting Irish Badges

E-mail Print PDF

by Liam Byrne

Welcome to another episode in the continuing saga of the Irish badge collector. After so many ‘goodies’ last time, I’m sorry to say that there are only ‘common’ badges in this issue. But I hope that does not decrease the interest.

Register to read more...
 

We Will Remember Them

E-mail Print PDF
The Limerick Branch of the Royal British Legion will unveil a memorial tablet on the city War Memorial in July to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the disbandment of the Irish regiments. As is usual in such ceremonies in that city, they will be joined by their comrades of the Organization of National Ex-Servicemen, Patrick Sarsfield Branch.
 

Some Thoughts on Irish Medal Research

E-mail Print PDF

by E.H. O’Toole

There seems to be some increase in interest worldwide in the medals of the Irish Free State/Republic of Ireland. This is evidenced by significant increases in prices and by the number of queries received by officers and members of MSOI. As the only organization which can claim to deal exclusively with the subject it behoves the Society to consider what steps might be taken to improve the present unsatisfactory situation as regards these medals.

Register to read more...
 

The Royal Irish at Namur

E-mail Print PDF
The Royal Irish Regiment (18th Foot) was raised by Charles III in Ireland from independent companies of pikemen and musketeers and could boast a proud record of 238 years unbroken service at the time of their disbandment in 1922. In their initial continental campaign they gave full proof of their fighting qualities in storming the fortress of Namur under the personal supervision of William III and won the admiration of the whole army. For their gallantry on this occasion they were granted the privilege of bearing the King’s escutcheon, the Lion of Nassau, on their colours, with the motto VIRTUTIS NAMURCENSIS PROEMIUM (The Reward for Valour at Namur). This was the first instance of a battle honour being granted to a British regiment.
 


Page 53 of 53
Home Browse Journal Articles

MSOI Login

VirtueMart Shopping Cart

VirtueMart
Your Cart is currently empty.